Is psychiatric medication helping or hurting children?

Over the course of the past few decades, psychiatric medication has become vastly common and accepted in America. These modern medical breakthroughs in treating mental illnesses – such as depression, anxiety, and ADHD – are helping millions of people across the nation. It’s huge prevalence inevitable brings a rise in prescription drug abuse, especially from stimulants like Adderall, or sedatives like Xanax. However, the biggest concern to come from this rise in psychiatric medication seems to be that these drugs are unnecessary or possibly harmful, especially for the developing mind of a child. In a report from the prescription data company IMS Health, it’s been revealed that over a million toddlers, ages zero to five years old, have been reported to be taking psychiatric medication. This number is shocking since most of these drugs’ long-term effects are unknown and for most psychiatric drugs, giving out prescriptions to infants falls outside of the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. It also is somewhat revealing of how easily a doctor can prescribe these drugs, usually without an examination or diagnosis. Because of these loose prescriptions, there have been many reported incidents where these drugs backfire and end up worsening a child’s condition, even leading to sudden death in some cases. With a lack of research behind these drugs, parents and doctors don’t fully know what they’re getting into and are at a high risk of harming a child’s development.

In my podcast below, I explain some precautions you could take when dealing with psychiatric medication and how you can limit the risk of harm.

 

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