The Impact of Music

Do you want to know how music impacts our society?

If so keep reading!

Music is a major part of modern society. Music is heard everywhere. You hear music in restaurants, on the radio, and even when you shop. Music in retail stores effect customers significantly. Customer’s moods, behavior, and their time duration in a store could all change because of the music playing in a store.

Watch this interviewer interview people on the streets about their own reactions to in store music.

This interviewer on the streets interviewing different types of people notifies us about what people truly think about in store music. In this interview people are saying positive things about in store music. For instance, if they like the song playing they will stay longer in the store and shop. The interviewer interviews different types of people to show us that everyone in our society is impacted by in store music and not just certain people.

Different types of music are used in stores to attract certain cohorts. In a research study done by James Kellaris found that stores will play music that fits that type of store to attract an age group. An example of a store that is mentioned in the study using a certain type of music to gain a cohort’s attention is Saks Fifth Avenue. Saks Fifth Avenue uses “elegant background music” to possibly attract an older cohort

effect-of-background-music

This image tells us about 5 different ways that background music in stores effects customers. These effects talk about what type of music should be played so it’s beneficial for the customer and even the business. One effect also mentions that background music gives the shoppers a better shopping environment.

in-store music tweet

Eva Golightly even agrees that if retailers play in store music they could see a major change in their business. Playing music in a store is also a way to make the customer have more of an enjoyable shopping experience. Eva Golightly posted a link in her tweet to show research results on how music is an affective way to keep shoppers shopping and pleased.

Music tends to speak to people personally. When people listen to music they find themselves becoming more relaxed or having more energy. This is a reason why retailers use music in their store. Retailers want their customers to be motivated and relaxed at the same time while they shop. Music is one way to trick customers to not only shop but spend money. Having a peaceful song playing in the background of a store will speak to a customer. The customers will find themselves walking around with a smile on their face feeling relaxed and motivated to shop while they’re listening to music.

Starting in November Christmas music starts to play in many stores. Christmas music has an effect on customers during the holiday season because it gives customers motivation to keep on shopping even though they may be tired. Here’s an example of a christmas song that I hear most often around the holiday season.

 

Podcast

 “Keep shoppers happily browsing in the store for hours”

 

Word Cited

Buble, Michael. It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas. 2011. MP3.

Golightly, Eva (mightyduck83). “Retailers could boost their bottom line by placing music at the heart of their customer experience http://bit.ly/1jfaMxR #InstoreMusic.” 5 Feb. 2014, 5:13 a.m. Tweet.

Holdcom. “The Impact of Background Music on Retail Shopping.” 2011. JPEG file.

Kuhn, Scott, and Dave Carter. “The Music Played in Your New Store Can Impact How Your Customers Shop.” The Store Starters. n.p., n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014.

Mindy, Fetterman, and O’Donnell Jayne. “Just browsing at the mall? That’s what you think.” USA Today 01 Sept. 2006: Academic Search Complete. Web. 29 Nov. 2014.

Music Works. “In-store Music: Background Noise or Sales Generator?” Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 4 Jan. 2010. Web. 24 Nov. 2014.

Schutte, Shane. “Retailers could boost their bottom line by placing music at the heart of their customer experience.” Real Business. n.p., 29 Jan. 2014. Web. 26 Nov 2014.

Smith, Ray A. “Shop Too Much? Blame the Music.” Wall Street Journal – Eastern Edition 262.139 (2013): D1-D3. Academic Search Complete. Web. 29 Nov. 2014.

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